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Linaria dalmatica

Linaria dalmatica (L.) Mill.

 

Dalmatian Toadflax

KingdomPlantaePlants, but not fungi, lichens, or algae
SubkingdomTracheobiontaVascular plants—plants with a “circulatory system” for delivering water and nutrients
DivisionMagnoliophytaFlowering plants, also known as angiosperms
ClassMagnoliopsidaDicotyledons—plants with two initial seed leaves
SubclassAsteridaeA large class that encompasses asters
OrderLamialesAromatic herbs and shrubs, including lavender, lilac, olive, jasmine, ash, teak, snapdragon, sesame, psyllium, garden sage, mint, basil, and rosemary
FamilyPlantaginaceaePlantains
GenusLinariaFrom the Latin linum, “flax,” referring to the flax-like leaves of some species
SpeciesdalmaticaOf or from Dalmatia on the Adriatic side of the Balkan Peninsula

About plant names...

Dalmatian toadflax is native to western Asia and south­eastern Europe. It was introduced to the United States late in the nineteenth century, and has spread across much of the western United States and Canada, invading rangelands, disturbed areas, and natural habitats.

Plants: These robust plants put down roots as deep as 6' (1.8 m) underground. Stems are 16-39" (40-100 cm) high, mostly erect, often branched, stout, and round.

Leaves: alternate, in pairs or triplets on the upper part of the stem, attached directly to the stem (sessile), often bent, with sharp tips and broad bases. Leaves are leathery, hairless (glabrous), with a waxy layer that makes them somewhat bluish in color, and veins roughly parallel to leaf edges. Lower leaves are ⅜-1¾" (1-5 cm) long, and linear to lanceolate. Upper leaves are 1-2" (3-6 cm) × ⅜-1½" (1-4 cm), lanceolate to broadly ovate.

Flowers: Flowers are yellow, light yellow, or rarely, white. They appear on spiked racemes, and resemble snapdragons or butter and eggs. Each flower is up to 2" (5 cm) across, and has two “lips” and an orange hairy throat which offers nectar to pollinators.

Fruits: Seed capsules are round, less than ¼" (7.6 mm) in diameter, each containing two seed-filled chambers. A single plant produces 500,000 seeds, and if that isn’t enough, its extensive root system allows it to survive fire and attempts at eradication.

Edibility: Poisonous. Skull & Crossbones Toxic to livestock in large quan­tities.

Online References:

Linaria dalmatica at Minnesota Wildflowers

Linaria dalmatica on gobotany.nativeplanttrust.org

Linaria dalmatica on agri.nv.gov

Linaria dalmatica at the Bugwood Wiki

Linaria dalmatica at cabi.org’s Invasive Species Compendium

Linaria dalmatica on the USDA Forest Service's Fire Effects Information Database

Linaria dalmatica (Dalmatian Toadflax)

9/19/2010 · Nashua River Rail Trail, Hollis, NH
≈ 8 × 12" (20 × 31 cm)

Linaria dalmatica (Dalmatian Toadflax)

9/19/2010 · Nashua River Rail Trail, Hollis, NH
≈ 5 × 3½" (13 × 9.2 cm)

Linaria dalmatica (Dalmatian Toadflax)

6/2/2016 · Near North Middlesex High, Townsend, MA

Linaria dalmatica (Dalmatian Toadflax)

6/2/2016 · Near North Middlesex High, Townsend, MA

Linaria dalmatica (Dalmatian Toadflax)

9/19/2010 · Nashua River Rail Trail, Hollis, NH
≈ 7 × 11" (18 × 27 cm)

Linaria dalmatica description by Thomas H. Kent, last updated 11 Jul 2019.

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Linaria dalmatica (Dalmatian Toadflax)

6/2/2016 · Near North Middlesex High, Townsend, MA

Linaria dalmatica (Dalmatian Toadflax)

9/19/2010 · Nashua River Rail Trail, Hollis, NH
≈ 5 × 3½" (13 × 9.2 cm)

Linaria dalmatica (Dalmatian Toadflax)

6/2/2016 · Near North Middlesex High, Townsend, MA

Linaria dalmatica (Dalmatian Toadflax)

6/2/2016 · Near North Middlesex High, Townsend, MA

Linaria dalmatica (Dalmatian Toadflax)

6/2/2016 · Near North Middlesex High, Townsend, MA

Linaria dalmatica (Dalmatian Toadflax)

6/2/2016 · Near North Middlesex High, Townsend, MA

Linaria dalmatica (Dalmatian Toadflax)

9/19/2010 · Nashua River Rail Trail, Hollis, NH
≈ 8 × 12" (20 × 31 cm)

Range:

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