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Lupinus arizonicus

Lupinus arizonicus (S. Watson) S. Watson

 

Arizona Lupine

KingdomPlantaePlants, but not fungi, lichens, or algae
SubkingdomTracheobiontaVascular plants—plants with a “circulatory system” for delivering water and nutrients
DivisionMagnoliophytaFlowering plants, also known as angiosperms
ClassMagnoliopsidaDicotyledons—plants with two initial seed leaves
SubclassRosidaeRoses, legumes, proteas, dogwoods, hydrangeas, mistletoes, euphorbias, grapes, many more
OrderFabalesLegumes (pea and bean families)
FamilyFabaceaeLegume family (peas and beans)
GenusLupinus“Wolf,” because of the mistaken belief that lupines ravage land they grow on; in fact, they contribute nutrients
SpeciesarizonicusOf or from Arizona

About plant names...

Arizona lupines are natives of the Mojave and Sonoran deserts in the American southwest and northwestern Mex­ico. They prefer washes, sandy flats, and hillsides, at ele­va­tions below 3500' (1 km).

Plants: 4-20" (10-50 cm) high, topped by a hairy spike of flowers.

Leaves: Leaves are palmate, comprised of 6-10 narrow leaflets, like spokes on a wheel, on petioles (stems) up to 3" (7.6 cm) long. The spokes of the wheel are thought to gather rainwater, concentrating it at the center of the wheel in order to absorb every precious bit. Leaflets are ⅜-1½" (1-4 cm) long and 1¾-4" (5-10 cm) wide, so each palmate leaf cluster is up to about 3" (8 cm) in diameter. Leaves may be curled along the edges, resembling pea pod halves in shape. Upper leaf surfaces are hairless, while lower sur­faces have sparse hairs.

Flowers: Flowers are large spikes filled with striking dark pink to magenta flowers that age to purplish blue. They spiral around the stem. Each flower is ¼-⅜" (7-10 mm) long, and is supported by a small, hairy bract. The upper petal has a yellow spot, changing to red after the flower is pollinated. Flowers appear from March to May.

Fruits: pods ⅜-¾" (1-2 cm) × ⅛" (5 mm), often on one side of the flowerhead, covered with coarse hairs. Upon ripen­ing, seed pods dry and explode to scatter seed.

Online References:

Lupinus arizonicus on www.americansouthwest.net

Lupinus arizonicus on www.desertwildflower.com

Lupinus arizonicus on DesertUSA: Exploring the Southwest

Lupinus arizonicus at Southeastern Arizona Wildflowers and the Plants of the Sonoran Desert

Lupinus arizonicus at the Sonoran Desert Naturalist

Lupinus arizonicus from the Jepson Manual

Lupinus arizonicus (Arizona Lupine)

5/3/2018 · Joshua Tree National Park, CA
≈ 10 × 6" (24 × 16 cm)

Lupinus arizonicus (Arizona Lupine)

5/3/2018 · Joshua Tree National Park, CA
≈ 6 × 8" (16 × 19 cm)

Lupinus arizonicus description by Thomas H. Kent, last updated 17 Aug 2019.

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Lupinus arizonicus (Arizona Lupine)

5/3/2018 · Joshua Tree National Park, CA
≈ 8 × 12" (20 × 31 cm)

Lupinus arizonicus (Arizona Lupine)

5/3/2018 · Joshua Tree National Park, CA
≈ 6 × 10" (16 × 24 cm)

Lupinus arizonicus (Arizona Lupine)

5/3/2018 · Joshua Tree National Park, CA
≈ 6 × 10" (16 × 24 cm)

Lupinus arizonicus (Arizona Lupine)

5/3/2018 · Joshua Tree National Park, CA
≈ 6 × 9" (16 × 21 cm)

Range:

About this map...