FloraFinder.com
Home   About Us   Want to Help?   FAQ  
Searching   Image Use Biblio

Phellinus igniarius

Phellinus igniarius (L.) Quél. (1886)

Agaricus igniarius (L.) E. H. L. Krause 1932

Boletus igniarius L. 1753

Boletus nigricans (Fr.) Spreng. 1827

Fomes igniarius forma alni Bondartsev 1935

Fomes igniarius forma nigricans Bondartsev 1935

Fomes igniarius (L.) Cooke 1885

Fomes igniarius var. nigricans (Fr.) Rick 1925

Fomes igniarius var. trivialis (Bres.) Killerm. 1928

Fomes nigricans (Fr.) Gillet 1878

Fomes trivialis (Fr.) Bres. 1931

Ganoderma trivialis Bres.

Mucronoporus igniarius (L.) Ellis and Everh. 1889

Mucronoporus nigricans (Fr.) Ellis and Everh. 1889

Ochroporus alni (Bondartsev) Fiasson and Niemelä 1984

Ochroporus igniarius (L.) J. Schröt. 1888

Ochroporus igniarius var. trivialis (Bres.) Niemelä 1985

Phellinus alni (Bondartsev) Parmasto 1976

Phellinus igniarius forma alni (Bondartsev) Cetto 1987

Phellinus igniarius nigricans (Fr.) Bourdot and Galzin 1925

Phellinus igniarius var. alni (Bondartsev) Niemelä 1975

Phellinus igniarius var. igniarius (L.) Quél. 1886

Phellinus igniarius var. trivialis (Bres. Ex Killerm.) Niemelä 1975

Phellinus nigricans (Fr.) P. Karst. 1899

Phellinus trivialis (Bres.) Kreisel 1964

Placodes igniarius (L.) Quél. 1888

Placodes nigricans (Fr.) Quél. 1888

Polyporites igniarius (L.) Heer

Polyporus igniarius (L.) Fr. 1821

Polyporus igniarius var. nigricans (Fr.) Jørst. 1937

Polyporus nigricans forma trivialis Fr.

Polyporus nigricans Fr. 1821

Pseudofomes nigricans (Fr.) Lázaro Ibiza 1916

Pyropolyporus igniarius (L.) Murrill 1903

Scindalma igniarium (L.) Kuntze 1898

Scindalma nigricans (Fr.) Kuntze 1898

Horse Hooves

ParentsUnknownGenus is not in the current taxonomy
GenusPhellinus
Speciesigniarius

About plant names...

Horse hooves are native to the northern half of North America.

Identification: These large shelf-like fungi lives on trunks of birch and aspen, as well as alder, madrone, manzanita, maple, and willow, often on living trees. It forms dark brown or black, woody, hoof-shaped fruits 1¾-8" (5-20 cm) around and almost as thick. As it ages it becomes cracked or furrowed and darker in color. It generally has no stalk.

Edibility: Horse hooves are not edible, says David Arora, author of Mushrooms Demystified, “unless you are fond of wood.” Tom Volk’s Fungus of the Month site describes its possible use in conjunction with tobacco by native Americans; similar use is also attributed to some Inupiaq and Yup’ik Eskimos of Western Alaska in the past and even today. Ashes from the mushrooms are said to contribute “a powerful kick” when smoked with tobacco. Research indicates that this is a serious health risk.

Online References:

Phellinus igniarius on ZipcodeZoo.com

Phellinus igniarius on RogersMushrooms.com

Phellinus igniarius on Tom Volk's Fungi site, at the Department of Biology at the University of Wisconsin

Phellinus igniarius at Wisconsin Mushrooms

Phellinus igniarius on Wikimedia Commons

Phellinus igniarius on RogersMushrooms.com

References:

Arora, David, Mushrooms Demystified, Ten Speed Press, 1986, p. 581

Phellinus igniarius description by Thomas H. Kent, last updated 16 Aug 2013.

© FloraFinder.com. All rights reserved.


 

Phellinus igniarius (Horse Hooves)

Growing on Birch. · 10/3/2010 · Tarkill Interpretive Trail, Rte 402, Poconos, Peck’s Pond, PA
≈ 8 × 12" (20 × 31 cm) ID is uncertain

Phellinus igniarius (Horse Hooves)

Growing on Birch. · 10/3/2010 · Tarkill Interpretive Trail, Rte 402, Poconos, Peck’s Pond, PA
≈ 15 × 10" (39 × 26 cm) ID is uncertain

Phellinus igniarius (Horse Hooves)

8/25/2013 · Cranberry Meadow Pond Trail, Monadnock Conservancy, Peterborough, NH
≈ 5 × 3" (12 × 8.4 cm) ID is uncertain

Phellinus igniarius (Horse Hooves)

8/25/2013 · Cranberry Meadow Pond Trail, Monadnock Conservancy, Peterborough, NH
≈ 6 × 4" (15 × 10 cm) ID is uncertain

Phellinus igniarius (Horse Hooves)

Growing on Birch. · 10/3/2010 · Tarkill Interpretive Trail, Rte 402, Poconos, Peck’s Pond, PA
≈ 17 × 12" (44 × 29 cm) ID is uncertain

Phellinus igniarius (Horse Hooves)

The host tree is a yellow birch (Betula alleghaniensis). · 10/3/2010 · Tarkill Interpretive Trail, Rte 402, Poconos, Peck’s Pond, PA
≈ 10 × 15" (26 × 39 cm)