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Rosa

 

Rose, Dwarf Rose

KingdomPlantaePlants, but not fungi, lichens, or algae
SubkingdomTracheobiontaVascular plants—plants with a “circulatory system” for delivering water and nutrients
DivisionMagnoliophytaFlowering plants, also known as angiosperms
ClassMagnoliopsidaDicotyledons—plants with two initial seed leaves
SubclassRosidaeRoses, legumes, proteas, dogwoods, hydrangeas, mistletoes, euphorbias, grapes, many more
OrderRosalesRose family and eight others
FamilyRosaceaeIncludes apples, apricots, plums, cherries, peaches, pears, raspberries, strawberries, almonds, roses, meadowsweets, photinias, firethorns, rowans, and hawthorns; many others
GenusRosaFrom a Latin name so old its meaning is no longer known

About plant names...

Many varieties of wild roses are North American natives. Some, like rugosa rose, are from other parts of the world, but have escaped and proven very successful in North America. Innumerable cultivated varieties exist as well. Unfortunately, though, horticulturists as a rule have been more interested in the beauty of the blossoms than in the sublime scent of roses, and the cultivars are nearly odorless.

Edibility: The fruit from many wild roses—”rose hips”—is edible, and rich in vitamin C. It can be cooked and used for jam, but it is a challenging process, since the usable portion of the fruit is a thin layer above the seeds, and the seeds are encased in hairlike fibers that can irritate the mouth and digestive tract if accidentally eaten. Fruits are also made into rose hip tea.

 

Rosa (Rose, Dwarf Rose)

Rose (Rosa) · 8/27/2007 · Shore Acres State Park, Cape Arago, OR
≈ 22 × 15" (55 × 37 cm) Species not yet identified

Rosa (Rose, Dwarf Rose)

Dwarf Rose (Rosa) · 7/17/2010 · Stan and Connie’s, Falmouth, ME
≈ 12 × 8" (31 × 20 cm) Species not yet identified

Here are several common species of wild rose:

 
Rosa carolina

Rosa eglanteria

Rosa multiflora
Common Name

Pasture Rose

Sweet-brier

Multiflora Rose
Plant A low shrub 12-36" (30-91 cm) high, erect or sprawling. Stems have straight, needlelike, relatively slender thorns. 6½-9½' (2-3 m) high. Stems have many stout curved thorns. The foliage smells like apples. 9½-16' (3-5 m), disheveled and sprawling. It has strong, thorny stems, with thorns that are curved backward.
Flowers Solitary, pink (rarely white) with yellow centers, with five petals, fragrant, about ¾-1½" (1.9-3.8 cm) in diameter. In loose clusters of one to eight, each 1-1½" (2.5-3.8 cm) around, pink or bright pink, with 5 petals. Abundant white or pinkish flowers, about ½-1½" (1.5-4 cm) in diameter, with five petals and yellow centers, in large corymbs (flower clusters).
Leaves In clusters of five or seven, with a single leaf at the end of each branch. They are ovate (oval, with pointed ends), and serrated. Leaf undersides are bluish and hairless, or with only a few hairs. Odd pinnate—occuring in clusters of 5 or 7 evenly sized opposite leaves with the odd leaf at the end of the branch. Individual leaves are about ½" (1.3 cm) long, oval, with double serrations. Roughly oval in shape, with sharply toothed edges, 1¾-4" (5-10 cm) long, in groups of 5-11 (usually 9).
Fruit Rose hips are smooth, red, shiny globes, sometimes somewhat flattened, about ¼-⅜" (8-12 mm) around. Up to ⅞" (2.5 cm) in diameter, bright red-orange, sometimes elongated into ovals. Orange-red to purplish, ⅛-¼" (6-8 mm) in diameter.
Range/ Zones

USDA Zones: 4-9

USDA Zones: 4-9

Habitats Dry meadows, prairies, fields, woodland openings Dry, open or disturbed sites, with a preference for limestone (calcium-bearing) soils Any open area with medium moisture: roadsides, abandoned pastures, open woodlands, thickets
Type Wild Wild Wild
Occurrence Common Locally common Common; invasive

 

 
Rosa palustris

Rosa rugosa

Rosa virginiana
Common Name

Swamp Rose

Rugosa Rose

Virginia Rose
Plant 6-8' (1.8-2.4 m) tall, with multiple, thorny stems. Thorns are widely spaced, single or sometimes paired, and hooked, curving backward. Rugosa rose is easy to identify. It is a shrub 3-6' (1-1.8 m) high, with stems that have zillions of variably sized thorns. The thorns are straight or nearly so, varying from ⅛-⅜" (3-10 mm) in length.

4-6' (1.2-1.8 m) tall, with erect, upright stems and stout, hooked thorns that are flattened at the base.
Flowers 1½-2" (3.8-5.8 cm) in diameter, solitary (or in small clusters), light to dark pink, with five petals and strong rose fragrance. They appear from June to July. White or pink, 2½-3½" (6.3-8.9 cm) around, with five petals. They may be solitary on in clusters, and appear from June to August. Flowers are pink, solitary, 2-2½" (5-6.3 cm) around, with a yellow center.
Leaves Dark green, 1¼-2½" (3.2-6.3 cm) long, roughly oval with pointed tips, with finely serrated edges. They occur in odd pinnate groups, most commonly with 7 leaflets, sometimes with 5 or 9. Odd pinnate clusters of 5-9 leaflets, usually 7. Clusters are 3-6" (8-15 cm) long, and the individual leaflets are 1-1½" (3-4 cm) long. Leaves are shiny, dark green, and deeply veined (technically, rugose, hence the species name). Leaf undersides are light green from dense feltlike hairs. Odd pinnate—in clusters of 7 to 9 leaflets, with the odd leaflet at the end of the branch. Each leaflet is 1-1¼" (2.5-3.2 cm) long, dark green, with serrations that point forward and are coarser than those of swamp rose.
Fruit Red, less than ½" (1.3 cm) around. Glossy “rose hips” up to 1" (2.5 cm) around, ball-shaped but somewhat flattened, orange to deep red. Bright red, ¼-½" (6.3-12 mm) in diameter
Range/ Zones

USDA Zones: 4-9

USDA Zones: 4-7
Habitats Wet habitats: stream banks, swamps, marshes Seacoasts, sandy roadsides, beaches, dunes Moist to dry meadows, cleared areas, thickets, roadsides, freshwater (but not seawater) shores
Type Wild Wild Wild
Occurrence   Locally common Locally common

 

Rosa (Rose, Dwarf Rose)

Rose (Rosa) · 6/29/2008 · MacDonalds, Westford
≈ 7 × 4½" (17 × 11 cm) Species not yet identified

Rosa (Rose, Dwarf Rose)

Rose (Rosa) · 7/23/2005 · MacDonalds, Westford, MA Species not yet identified

Rosa (Rose, Dwarf Rose)

(Rosa) · 9/10/2011 · Ellen and Rod’s, Westford, MA
≈ 7 × 11" (18 × 27 cm) Species not yet identified

Rosa (Rose, Dwarf Rose)

Rose (Rosa) · 8/27/2007 · Shore Acres State Park, Cape Arago, OR Species not yet identified

Rosa description by Thomas H. Kent, last updated 16 Aug 2013.

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Rosa (Rose, Dwarf Rose)

(Rosa) · Variety 'Julia Child' · 9/10/2011 · Ellen and Rod’s, Westford, MA
≈ 8 × 5" (19 × 13 cm) Species not yet identified

Rosa (Rose, Dwarf Rose)

Dwarf Rose (Rosa) · 7/17/2010 · Stan and Connie’s, Falmouth, ME
≈ 4 × 3½" (10 × 8.7 cm) Species not yet identified

Rosa (Rose, Dwarf Rose)

Rose (Rosa) · 8/27/2007 · Shore Acres State Park, Cape Arago, OR
≈ 15 × 10" (38 × 25 cm) Species not yet identified

Rosa (Rose, Dwarf Rose)

Rose (Rosa) · 8/27/2007 · Shore Acres State Park, Cape Arago, OR
≈ 15 × 10" (37 × 24 cm) Species not yet identified

Rosa (Rose, Dwarf Rose)

Dwarf Rose (Rosa) · 7/17/2010 · Stan and Connie’s, Falmouth, ME
≈ 8 × 5" (19 × 13 cm) Species not yet identified

Rosa (Rose, Dwarf Rose)

Rose (Rosa) · 7/23/2005 · MacDonalds, Westford, MA Species not yet identified

Rosa (Rose, Dwarf Rose)

Rose (Rosa) · 8/12/2007 · Westford, MA
≈ 15 × 10" (37 × 25 cm) Species not yet identified