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Sisymbrium officinale

Sisymbrium officinale (L.) Scop.

Erysimum officinale L.

Sisymbrium officinale (L.) Scop. var. leiocarpum DC.

Hedge Mustard

KingdomPlantaePlants, but not fungi, lichens, or algae
SubkingdomTracheobiontaVascular plants—plants with a “circulatory system” for delivering water and nutrients
DivisionMagnoliophytaFlowering plants, also known as angiosperms
ClassMagnoliopsidaDicotyledons—plants with two initial seed leaves
SubclassRosidaeRoses, legumes, proteas, dogwoods, hydrangeas, mistletoes, euphorbias, grapes, many more
OrderBrassicalesMustard, cabbage, caper, papaya, nasturtiums, many others; most produce mustard oil
FamilyBrassicaceaeMustards, cabbages
GenusSisymbriumA Greek name for some plant of the mustard family
SpeciesofficinaleSold as an herb, often applied to plants with real or supposed medicinal qualities

About plant names...

Hedge mustard shows up in hedge banks, uncultivated ground, disturbed areas, waste ground, meadows, and cultivated land. It is native to Europe, including Britain, south and east from Scandanavia to North Africa and the Near East. It is naturalized in North America.

Plants: Plants are 18-42" (45-106 cm) high, with an erect light green to purplish green stem that is round, branched, and leafy.

Leaves: A basal rosette of leaves form first, looking a little like dandelion leaves (petiolate-pinnatifid). Lower leaves are up to 8" (20 cm) × 2" (5 cm). Upper leaves are oblong-lanceolate, often hastate, becoming progressively smaller, and are divided into three lobes.

Flowers: Stems are tipped by narrow racemes of small pale yellow flowers. Each flower has four petals, four green to yellow sepals, a central style, and several stamens.

Fruits: Narrow, cylindrical seedpods (siliques), less than ⅝" (1.7 cm) in length.

Medical: Hedge mustard does not have any proven uses. Folk medicine sometimes used it for laryngitis and hoarseness, chronic bronchitis, and inflam­mation of the gallbladder.

Online References:

Sisymbrium officinale at Illinois Wildflowers

Sisymbrium officinale on the New England Wildflower Society’s GoBotany site

Sisymbrium officinale on Wikipedia

Sisymbrium officinale on Plants for a Future, a resource and information centre for edible and otherwise useful plants

References:

Clemants, Steven; Gracie, Carol, Wildflowers in the Field and Forest, Oxford University Press, 2006, p. 144

Multiple Authors, PDR for Herbal Medicines, Thomson Healthcare Inc., 2007, p. 434

Sisymbrium officinale (Hedge Mustard)

6/26/2012 · Nashua River Rail Trail, Dunstable, Dunstable, MA
≈ 5 × 3½" (13 × 9.2 cm)

Sisymbrium officinale description by Thomas H. Kent, last updated 24 Jun 2017.

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Sisymbrium officinale (Hedge Mustard)

6/26/2012 · Nashua River Rail Trail, Dunstable, Dunstable, MA
≈ 4½ × 7" (11 × 17 cm)

Sisymbrium officinale (Hedge Mustard)

6/26/2012 · Nashua River Rail Trail, Dunstable, Dunstable, MA
≈ 7 × 6" (18 × 14 cm)

Sisymbrium officinale (Hedge Mustard)

6/26/2012 · Nashua River Rail Trail, Dunstable, Dunstable, MA
≈ 5 × 5" (13 × 12 cm)

Sisymbrium officinale (Hedge Mustard)

6/26/2012 · Nashua River Rail Trail, Dunstable, Dunstable, MA
≈ 1½ × 1¾" (4.1 × 4.5 cm)

Range:

About this map...