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Ajuga reptans

Ajuga reptans L.

 

Bugle, Blue Bugle, Bugleherb, Bugleweed, Carpetweed, Carpet Bugleweed, Common Bugle

KingdomPlantaePlants, but not fungi, lichens, or algae
SubkingdomTracheobiontaVascular plants—plants with a “circulatory system” for delivering water and nutrients
DivisionMagnoliophytaFlowering plants, also known as angiosperms
ClassMagnoliopsidaDicotyledons—plants with two initial seed leaves
SubclassAsteridaeA large class that encompasses asters
OrderLamialesAromatic herbs and shrubs, including lavender, lilac, olive, jasmine, ash, teak, snapdragon, sesame, psyllium, garden sage, mint, basil, and rosemary
FamilyLamiaceaeMint family
GenusAjugaBugleweed, ground pine or carpet bugle
SpeciesreptansHaving creeping and rooting stems

About plant names...

Carpet-bugle is a European native, grown as a groundcover and now naturalized in North America. In some areas it is considered an invasive. It prefers damp grassy fields, and damp woods. There are many cultivars.

Identification: Carpet-bugle forms loose mats. Plants are 6-9" (15-22 cm) in height. Leaves are dark green with purple highlights, opposite, and simple, sometimes toothed. Flowers are blue, appearing from May to Jun.

Edibility: Poison Skull & Crossbones. Said to be hallucinogenic, and has caused fatalities.

Ajuga reptans (Bugle, Blue Bugle, Bugleherb, Bugleweed, Carpetweed, Carpet Bugleweed, Common Bugle)

Ajuga reptans. Jan Kops (1765–1849); illustrated by Christiaan Sepp, Flora Batava, Vol. 1, The Hague, 1800

 

Ajuga reptans (Bugle, Blue Bugle, Bugleherb, Bugleweed, Carpetweed, Carpet Bugleweed, Common Bugle)

4/3/2009 · Memphis, TN · By Tim Chandler

Ajuga reptans (Bugle, Blue Bugle, Bugleherb, Bugleweed, Carpetweed, Carpet Bugleweed, Common Bugle)

3/29/2008 · Memphis, TN · By Tim Chandler

Ajuga reptans (Bugle, Blue Bugle, Bugleherb, Bugleweed, Carpetweed, Carpet Bugleweed, Common Bugle)

5/18/2017 · Beaver Brook Conservation Area, Wildflower Trail, Hollis, NH
≈ 4 × 6" (10 × 15 cm)

Some similar species:

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Ajuga reptans

Glechoma hederacea

Lamium purpureum
Common Name

Bugle

Ground-ivy

Purple Dead-nettle
Plant Forms loose mats. Plants are 6-9" (15-22 cm) in height. Often only 3" (7.6 cm) tall, it sometimes reaches 12" (30 cm). Extends horizontally, hence the term “ivy.” 4-16" (10-40 cm) high, and somewhat hairy.
Flowers Blue, appearing from May to Jun. Flowers are blue, purple, or lavender, occurring in groups of 3. The flower shape is unusual. A small upper petal is divided into two lobes. A larger lower petal has a lobe on either side, and a large bottom lobe that is divided into two more lobes. Each flower is ⅜-½" (9.5-12 mm) across. Flowers are ¼-¾" (6.3-19 mm), appearing from Mar to Oct. They are pink to red to purple in color.
Leaves Dark green with purple highlights, opposite, and simple, sometimes toothed. Round or kidney-shaped, with scalloped edges, ⅜-1¼" (9.5-31 mm) in diameter. Toothed, round or kidney-shaped, deeply and irregularly veined, and ¼-1¼" (6.3-31 mm). Each stem node has two opposite leaves, and each succeeded pair is rotated 90° from the last. Upper, younger leaves often have a red-violet tinge.
Stem   Square in cross-section. Stems are 4-angled and glabrous.
Range/ Zones

USDA Zones: 3-10

Habitats Damp grassy fields, damp woods. Moist ground, woods, slopes, roadsides, waste places, lawns Fields, weedy places, gardens.
Type Wild Wild Wild
Occurrence Common Common Common

 

 
Prunella vulgaris
Common Name

Common Selfheal
Plant 1¾-16" (5-40 cm) high, usually toward the small end of this. It is often found in lawns.
Flowers On spikes at the top. They look uneven and disheveled because they don’t bloom all at once. Each flower is about ⅜" (1 cm) around, purple on top and white below, and bilaterally symmetrical.
Leaves Up to 2" (6 cm) × ¾" (2 cm), oval or sometimes lance-shaped, on fairly long petioles (leaf stems).
Stem Approximately square in cross section, green or reddish, and lightly to densely hairy.
Range/ Zones

Habitats Fields, roadsides, weedy area, open woods
Type Wild
Occurrence Common

 

Online References:

Ajuga reptans on the New England Wildflower Society’s GoBotany site

Ajuga reptans on Plants for a Future, a resource and information centre for edible and otherwise useful plants

Ajuga reptans at the Missouri Botanical Garden

Ajuga reptans on Wikipedia

References:

Clemants, Steven; Gracie, Carol, Wildflowers in the Field and Forest, Oxford University Press, 2006, p. 48

Ajuga reptans description by Thomas H. Kent, last updated 10 Jun 2017.

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Range: Zones 3-10:

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